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Charles B. Jenkins, EdS, EdD

School Psychologist
Psychology Associate
Specialty Population(s): Toddlers, Children, Adolescents, Young Adults in School
Specialty Area(s): Psychological Evaluations, Psychoeducational Evaluations, Mood and Emotional Disorders, Anxiety, Depression, Crisis Intervention

Dr. Jenkins is a Nationally Certified School Psychologist licensed in the states of Virginia, Tennessee, Maryland, and the District of Columbia, where he has served or is serving large, metro school districts and smaller, rural school districts. Dr. Jenkins assesses and counsels children, adolescents, and young adults with learning and emotional challenges in the public schools, and in private practice. He earned his Educational Specialist degree in School Psychology with a concentration in Advanced Educational Practices from the University of Tennessee. He completed his practicum and internship in Chattanooga, Tennessee where he provided counseling and psychological assessment to preschoolers, children, and adolescents. As a graduate research assistant, Dr. Jenkins developed data collection protocols to analyze large student datasets for accountability, research evaluation, and performance management projects, while simultaneously serving as Interim Managing Editor of the university’s only international peer-reviewed teaching journal. Dr. Jenkins completed his Doctorate in Educational Administration and Policy Studies at The George Washington University, focusing on the effects of mental health care on adolescents in urban school settings in order to uncover the causes of minority student’s learning difficulties.

Dr. Jenkins has presented original research on effective classroom-based assessments, as well as leadership, cognition, and locus of control at the Annual Southeastern Psychological Association conference, and the Annual Association for Psychological Science Convention. Dr. Jenkins has also presented district-wide in-services to educators for preventing and responding to various school crises.